Anne Frank and her neighbors

unique private walking tour 

  • Walking tour of the neighborhood  in Amsterdam where Anne Frank lived for more than eight years before going into hiding.

  • Experience her world in the context of the bigger, historical picture of those   times.

  • Let me share what I’ve learned from years of studying  Anne Frank's world, World War Two and the Holocaust.

Anne Frank with friends,

Merwedeplein 1939.

Description

In 1933 Anne Frank's parents rented an apartment on Merwedeplein in Amsterdam.  In Germany  Adolf Hitler had come to power and the Frank family hoped to find a safe haven in the neighborhood  like many other Jewish refugees.  During the walking tour I'll paint a vivid picture of their lives .

 

We will pause at locations that played an important role in the neighborhood’s history from 1933-1945, such as the synagogue and the school Anne Frank and other children attended. 

Among the locations visited will be those connected to the following topics:

Neighborhood synagogue in 1937.

Merwedeplein around 1932. 

  • The history of Anne frank and her family

  •  Jewish refugees in Amsterdam

  • The diversity of Jewish life

  • The German occupation: persecution and Jewish resistance 

  • Collaboration and betrayal

The walking tour can also be 100% personalized to your wishes. 

 

Practical Info

Duration:  approximately two hours.

Meeting point:  Anne Frank Statue on Merwedeplein (opposite no. 61).

Cost: 120 euro (1- 4 people) Each extra person costs 30 euro (max. 10 people).

 

If you want to book a tour, please email me the specific dates and times you would prefer. 

I’ll reply as quickly as possible with available options.

Anne Frank’s statue on Merwedeplein portrays this German Jewish girl on July 6 1942, the day she went into hiding with her parents and sister. 

Directions

Tram 12, stop Waalstraat , 1 minute walk to Merwedeplein.

Tram 4, stop Victorieplein, 2 minutes walk to Merwedeplein.

Metro (subway) line 52, stop Europaplein,10 minutes walk to Merwedeplein.

© Rian Verhoeven

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